Sunday, November 26, 2017

Links of Interest


We've entered the swing of the holiday season here in the US, and this is already turning out to be a very family-focused time for me this year. I've also had to fit in some sewing projects. The image above is a good ol' fashioned action shot of me sewing an overcast seam on a pilgrim bag I just finished. So since I didn't have enough time to put together a more typical blog post today, I wanted to share a few links to some things that may be of interest.

Katafalk, who focuses on several types of historical tailoring and crafts, has recently become more active on her blog again. (Hooray!) She posted a few weeks back about set-in sleeves, and I couldn't love this article enough. She goes into some of the common issues and troubleshoots them so that you can adjust your basic pattern (such as the one you might get from my sleeve patterning tutorial) to something more specific to your body and your garment. If sleeves are giving you trouble, I highly suggest this one.

Friend and fellow Midrealmer, Sarai at Clothing the Past has published a basic guide to patterning a fitted dress (cote, kirtle, cotehardie). She's developed this method to work with larger groups of women at local workshops, so it can be considered a bare bones beginner method that will get you started. If you want to make a fitted dress just to see if it's a period style you would enjoy, but other methods feel too intimidating or intense, I recommend looking over her method and giving it a shot.

Did you know I have an Instagram account? I share glimpses into what I'm doing over there that I don't post elsewhere (like that finished pilgrim bag I mentioned above.) It's a great, low-key alternative to following me on Facebook too. I'd be delighted if you followed me!

This gorgeous silk hood by Lady Malina has already been sold, but it's such a pretty hood (and inspiring to boot!), I couldn't resist sharing.

I'll be MIA for the next few weekends, but during that time, I'll have worn the last of my Doppelgänger Challenge outfits. When I return in mid-December, I'll have a full recap on that experience and what I learned from it. I'm looking forward to that.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

How I Dress for Cold Weather Events


In my neck of the woods, we can expect the possibility of a cool weather event between October and April. (Though that’s definitely not a guarantee- Midwest weather is fairly unpredictable.) It’s important to pay attention to weather forecasts heading into the weekend, because being unprepared for the weather is one sure-fire way to ruin an event. When I think back about events I was miserable at, in many cases it was because I was dressed too lightly.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

On My Worktable


After the rush of getting things done for my elevation, I decided to just chill out for a bit, and turn my attention to some other areas of my life. Which of course resulted in a bit of a longer break from productivity than I intended. So now I'm like a car with a battery that needs to be recharged. Despite this, I do have a few projects on my table that I'm at least giving the sidelong glance to as I work my way back to a productive pace. Here's what's on my radar.

Sunday, October 1, 2017

Project Complete: Apprenticeship

Thank you to everyone for the outpouring of support and love on my last post. I'm so grateful to be a part of such an amazing community!

So I figured I'd start this post where I left off on the last one. By that point, I had finished my new chemise, and finished refitting the gray wool dress.

I had washed and line-dried the blue herringbone wool for a new cote to wear during my vigil and into court. I used the two larger pattern pieces of my chemise to cut the wool as a symmetrical dress. I had intended on doing a front lacing, but when I got everything sewn together to try it on, I really liked the plain front look, and decided not to mess with a good thing. (Good thing too, I would not have had enough time to sew all the eyelets!)

Easy to get a bit cross-eyed sewing this herringbone.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Some News and a Handful of Projects

Photo by the incomparable Dame Marissa von Atzinger.
Last weekend, I was honored to be placed on vigil for the Order of the Laurel (the SCA's highest award for excellence in the arts & sciences). I have long hoped that being worthy of the Laurel would be a part of my journey, and though it is a milestone, not a destination, to be able to rest here a while and enjoy this step is exciting and fulfilling. My elevation will be occurring next weekend (hardly enough time to plan, but there are family reasons involved), so I am of course waist deep in sewing! I thought today I'd catch you up on my plan and what I've done so far.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Houppelandes of the Early 15th Century

Like most things clothing-related in this period, the sumptuous overgown we call the houppelande (usually pronounced HOOP-lawn in the circles I run with), has a layered evolution that has to be understood through both time and class. The houppelande style of gown may have been brought north from Italy in the later 14th century. It can be seen in the imagery of the Tacuinum Sanitatis manuscripts produced at the end of the 14th century, such as this striped example below, possibly from Milan.

Detail from Tacuinium Sanitatis, (Nouvelle acquisition latine 1673), fol. 81v, c. 1390.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

On Break

Source
Just a quick note that I'll be taking a break from the blog for the next several weeks. I wasn't able to swing going to Pennsic War this year, but I hope all of you headed there have a fun and safe time. I'll be back to my regular posting schedule in late August.